Chukkakura Pappu/Khatta Palak Dal | TummyKhush


Chukkakura, also known as red sorrel or Khatta palak in hindi is a very unique, sour-tasting green leafy vegetable. You could say it is slightly similar to gongura in flavour. The sourness of this green tastes good with a combinations of lentils (chukkakura pappu) or as a stew(pulusu). It can also be made into a chutney. If you are tasting this green for the first time, dal will be a good option to introduce yourself to its flavour.
The combination of dal and chukkakura is not only healthy and wholesome, but also delicious, balancing out all flavours.

Chukkakura pappu (4)

Here is a simple recipe for chukkakura pappu:

Chukkakura/red sorrel leaves/khatta palak – 2 small bunches
Remove the thick stems, wash well, chop finely and keep aside.

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Everyday Microwave tips


Microwaves have become an integral part of every kitchen. Depending on how much you have spent on your microwave, it is useful for a range of functions right from reheating to roasting to baking.

I turn on the microwave almost everyday for some reason or the other and often wonder how I survived without one for years.

Here are some of everyday uses for microwave, some I leant through personal experience, others through various sources.

1. Boiling potatoes: Just microwave the whole potato (along with the skin) for 3 minutes. The skin prevents the moisture from going out and the potato cooks with the internal moisture. If after 3 mins, you feel that the potato hasn’t cooked enough, just cook it for few more seconds.

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Masala Kichidi | TummyKhush


Rains call for some special food that is warm and comforting and spicy at the same time. Nothing beats having a bowl full of something warm and cozy while hearing the rains pattering away on the window. The universal favourite foods in rains include a bowl of soup, a hot cup of coffee or tea, deep fried foods or something similar. For me, Kichidi is one of those foods that just gives you that blanket of warmth. India has a rich history of lentils. We have a vast variety that would probably not be found anywhere else. Having a vegetarian tradition is one of the reasons. The protein content of the lentils combined with carbohydrate in the form of rice and a few warming spices lends kichidi its huge fan following. Kichidi with very little or no spice is fed to growing kids. I guess that is the reason why it feels so comforting. A familiar flavour that you have grown up with always gives that sense of security.

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Kichidi is eaten in many forms. Different states have different ways of cooking it with different dal and spices. The basic ingredients of dal and rice, though, never change. The inspiration behind this recipe is the rajasthani kichidi which I really love.

I hope you will enjoy this masala kichidi as much as I did. You can just vary the amount of spices depending on you like/dislike for them.

Here is how I made it.

Rice  – 1 cup
Moong dal/ Pesarapappu /mung beans/ split green gram – 1 cup

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Capsicum Curry with Chutney Powder | TummyKhush


All of us tend to have chutney powders in the home pantry, be it made by mom who stocks it up every time she comes visiting (in my case mom-in-law), or store bought. In any case these powders can make an excellent base for some curries. You could use either peanut chutney powder or bengal gram dal (I prefer peanut powder) Just throw in a few extra ingredients and you end up with spicy succulent curry which goes well with rice or chapatis. I prefer using these chutney powder with capsicum as the combination goes very well. These pictures were fished out from very old archives and realised I forgot to put this recipe in my blogpost.

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To make capsicum curry with chutney powder, you would need:

Capsicum – 3 to 4 medium sized, stem removed and chopped
Onion – 1 medium sized, skin removed and chopped/sliced

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Bagara Baingan / Vankaya Masala / Brinjal (eggplant) cooked in Spicy Gravy | TummyKhush


The best things in life happen in the least unplanned manner. That is how this recipe was born. The very fact that this blogpost doesn’t have many pictures proves the point. The husband bought very cute,tiny,round brinjals from the farmer’s market and wanted me to make bagara baingan. (It is one of his top favourites curries by the way). So after putting off making the recipe for almost a week, I decided enough is enough let me make it. I referred online for the recipe (my constant source of information of all types) and decided almost all the recipes were too complicated. So I just washed the brinjals and started frying them and decided to go with the flow and followed my instincts.And it was a hit. That’s when I decided to share it with you guys. This dish is a labour of love. So without further talking, let me go to the recipe.

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Here are the ingredients I used to make this recipe.

Brinjals – 1/2 kg
Peanuts – 1/2 cup
White sesame seeds (thella nuvvulu) – 3 to 4 tsp

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Kakarakaya Ullikaram/ Stuffed Karela(Bittergourd) | TummyKhush


Bittergourd.. you either love it or you hate it. There can’t be an in between. I fall in the former category. I love bittergourd. I also love any vegetable that is stuffed with onion paste and cooked. So, then, this is one of my favourite curries. The sweetness of the onions offsets the bitterness of the bittergourd creating a wonderful contrast. This is definitely one of my comfort food curries.

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You would need:

Bitter gourd : 1/4 kg

For the stuffing:

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